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from more than 30 years of walking the talk

The Bottom Line  is a weekly radio show that appears on Salt Lake City's public radio station KCPW. The show focuses on the human story behind building and running a successful company in Utah. The personal journey of its founders and leaders, the hard work, the tough decisions, the temporary setbacks and the occasional lucky breaks that all weave together to become part of the company’s fabric – its culture and its voice – that ultimately leads to the team’s success. Our goal is to bring the audience along on an intelligent, thought provoking conversation that is more about the journey than the destination.

 

  • Utah Refugees and Entrepreneurship on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    BottomLine_SquareThe Bottom Line – (Air date: June 6, 2017) Refugees arrive in Utah escaping political, religious or ethnic persecution. As they settle into the community, find work, and begin the process of assimilation, many refugees go on to innovate and start their own businesses.  This week host Doug Wells speaks with Aden Batar, Director of Immigration and Refugee Resettlement with Catholic Community Services, and Natalie El-Deiry, Deputy Director of Development & Strategic Initiatives with the International Rescue Committee. The IRC runs several entrepreneurship-focused programs including the nationally-recognized Spice Kitchen Incubator, a food entrepreneurship program in cooperation with Salt Lake County, that helps refugees and immigrants prepare to start their own food businesses.

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  • Diversifying Rural Utah Economies on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    The Bottom Line – (Air date: May 30, 2017) While the Wasatch Front is thriving, rural Utah is hurting. For generations many rural Utah communities have mostly depended on the extraction of fossil fuels (coal, oil, and natural gas) for local jobs. But this dependence has proven painful over the last decade. Disappearing coal jobs are hurting places like Carbon and Emery Counties, and the boom and bust cycles of oil and gas have left Uintah and Duchesne County residents uncertain.

    But the impact investment firm Accelerant BSP and the Utah Governor’s Office of Economic Development have been working to help local Utah communities develop new employment opportunities.  Joel McKay Smith’s firm Accelerant BSP works to pair hiring companies with rural communities. Ben Hart, Deputy Director of the Governor’s Office for Economic Development, also discusses how the state is helping rural Utah to expand its economic horizons.

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  • Finding a “Corporate Theory” on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    The Bottom Line – (Air date: May 23, 2017) Often people have goals for their business idea or company, but don’t really know how to achieve them.  Having a clear, sustaining value strategy, or a “corporate theory” as Todd Zenger coins it, is critical.  Todd Zenger is Professor of Strategy and Strategic Leadership at the University of Utah. He is also author of Beyond Competitive Advantage: How to Solve the Puzzle of Sustaining Growth While Creating Value. Zenger says corporate strategy is often determining “what we’re notgoing to do, rather than what we’re going to do.” Speaking with host Doug Wells, Zenger outlines the three “sights” that help determine a corporate theory, and discusses some well-known examples.

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  • Business 101: Learning the Value of Giving Back on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    BottomLine_SquareThe Bottom Line (Air Date: May 9, 2017) – Nowadays business students are taught not only the value of profiting, but also giving back. Rick Haskell, Assistant Professor of Finance, at Westminster College talks about his Business 101 class, that emphasizes “purpose-driven enterprise” and social entrepreneurism. Business students Fancesca Scopello and Noelle Johnson join the conversation and share their experiences.



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  • What Does a CFO Do? on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    BottomLine_SquareThe Bottom Line (Air Date: May 2, 2017) – Doug recently spoke with Bill Benz, a finance executive who has served as the Chief Financial Officer at Energy Solutions, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Colorado, Western Digital Corporation and other firms. They talk about the role that CFOs play inside their companies.






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  • Making ‘The Void’ on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    The Bottom Line (Air Date: April 25, 2017) – The Void is a new “virtual reality” center in Lindon, Utah. The company also has locations in New York City and Dubai.  Recently host Doug Wells spoke with co-founder and Chief Visionary Officer James Jensen, about the work that went into creating this new entertainment venue and the implications it has for further virtual reality innovations, gaming experiences, and even the future of the travel industry.

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  • The Emerging Future of Virtual Reality on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    Brian NelsonThe Bottom Line (Air Date: April 18, 2017) – Brian Nelson is a technology visionary and entrepreneur, and owner of Extech Ventures. He recently sat down with Host Doug Wells to discuss the gamut of emerging technologies and trends including virtual reality, artificial intelligence, and blockchain, and to what degree these technologies may be changing our lives.

     

     

     

     

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  • The Father of Video Games on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    The Bottom Line (Air Date: April 4, 2017) – Nolan Bushnell is known as the “Father of Video Games”. He is a legend and a pioneer in the high tech industry. He is the founder of Atari – which introduced the world to video games, as well as Chuck E. Cheese’s – which was Nolan’s strategy to introduce video games to children through a fun and animated arcade.  Nolan is also a Utah native – he was born in Clearfield, Utah in 1943. Bushnell has started more than 20 companies and has remained a prolific innovator. Host Doug Wells spoke to Bushnell about his book Finding the Next Steve Jobs: How to Find, Keep, and Nurture Talent, and about inspiring creativity and innovation.

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  • How to Get People to Eat Bugs, and Like It on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    The Bottom Line (Air Date: February 14, 2017) – How do you launch a sustainable food revolution? Perhaps it requires a good story, and lots and lot of crickets.

    When Pat Crowley realized he could make a better energy bar using “cricket flour” for protein, he knew he’d encounter the ick factor. Eating bugs simply doesn’t appeal to Americans. But he knew a lesson could be taken from the introduction of sushi to American taste buds in the 1970s. He knew he had to acknowledge people’s fear of eating bugs, before they would overcome it and take the first bite.

    Crowley talks with host Doug Wells about how he went from being a surf and whitewater raft guide to an entrepreneur who aims to create an entirely new food category. He is driven by his concern for our ability to conserve fresh drinking water in the future, and he says how we raise animals for protein is a big part of the problem. Crowley shares how he meticulously strategized to re-introduce crickets – an ancient food source – into our diets, with Chapul.

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  • She Tech Explorer Days

    The Bottom Line (Air Date: February 7, 2017) – Sara Dansie Jones joined Doug Wells recently to chat about the upcoming She Tech Explorer Days happening at three different locations throughout the state this spring.


    – March 3 at Utah Valley University
    – March 31, at Weber State
    – April 21, at Dixie State University

    Sara is co-founder of Womens Tech Council and co-organizer of the She Tech Conferences. She Tech’s goal is to introduce high school aged girls to STEM education – Science, Technology, Engineering and Math. They also organize TechArt Hour of Code. To date, more than 2,500 high school girls have participated in Explorer Days and more than 3,500 girls have participated in their Hour of Code.

    Sara also discusses some of the current challenges of helping young female programmers to land jobs with tech firms.

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  • The Shortcomings of the Sharing Economy – an Interview with Steven Hill

    The Bottom Line (Air Date: January 24, 2017) – Millions of Americans love using Uber, Lyft, Taskrabbit, Airbnb, Upwork and many other disruptive startups that comprise the emergent “sharing economy.”  But political writer and lecturer Steven Hill argues that people working for these businesses are paid less and are losing the certainty, security, and benefits that Americans depended on a generation ago. Hill is author of Raw Deal: How the “Uber Economy” and Runaway Capitalism Are Screwing American Workers. He discusses the current problems these “gig economy” businesses pose for workers, traditional businesses, and local governments, as well as possible solutions to protect workers going forward.

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  • Energizing Students with STEM through Tiny Satellites on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    The Bottom Line (Air Date: January 10, 2017) –Today’s satellites are smaller, more powerful, and cheaper than ever before. They’re also even accessible to school children.

    Sunny Washington, is President and co-founder of Ardusat, an educational technology company that partners with the private satellite company Spire Global that assembles, builds, and launches very small cube satellites. Ardusat provides K-12 students the ability to run custom math and science experiments on real life satellites orbiting the earth. In short, they aspire to make STEM (Science, Technology, Engineer and Math) accessible and fun for kids.

    Washington talks about her experience leaving Instructure to launch Ardusat. Also what it’s been like assembling her team, developing a STEM curriculum to help educators, and what’s next for the company – including partnering with schools in the United Arab Emirates.

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  • Solving Our Plastics Problem, While Profiting on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    The Bottom Line (Air Date: January 3, 2017) – Plastic waste is a massive problem globally. It’s over-filling our landfills and littering our oceans – and it will never decompose. But because plastic comes from oil, why can’t it be returned to oil, and be profitable? This is a solution Priyanka Bakaya has devoted much of her career working to solve. Her company PK Clean open its first full-scale commercial plant to convert plastics back into oil in Salt Lake City, Utah, a few years ago in partnership with Utah’s largest recycler, Rocky Mountain Recycling. Bakaya talks about the marginal – but profitable – economics of plastics recycling, how she got into the space, and how being a “Clean Tech” entrepreneur has become her passion.

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  • Hungry? Meet Hello Eats on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    The Bottom Line (Air Date: December 27, 2016) – Gabe Gundersen believes he has a better meal-ordering platform for hungry restaurant patrons, and restaurant managers who want help processing those orders. His Hello Eats will soon launch with partnering restaurants in Provo, Utah, and he thinks it will become the new go-to app for restaurants across the country. Gabe acknowledges this space already has competitors, with existing apps like Seamless and Grubhub. But he points out some restaurant owners have compared Seamless to the mob. Gabe says these apps exploit restaurants and create price inflation, which ultimately hurts restaurant owners. Gabe says his App, in comparison, will be payments-based and will cost restaurants and customers nothing to use. That means a low margin, but profitable at scale, he says.

    Gundersen is well-known in the Utah tech community. With his brother Jordan he co-founded Izeni, the Provo-based software developer that helps aspiring entrepreneurs to build websites and apps. Gabe also partnered with Clint Betts who created Beehive Startups to launch StartSLC in 2015.

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  • Smoothing the Mortgage Lending Process - Smoothing the Mortgage Lending Process,Smoothing the Mortgage Lending Process - Matt Hansen, Simple Nexus, on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    The Bottom Line (Air Date: December 20, 2016) – Matt Hansen has always loved to build things. In 2010 after he developed a simple mortgage loan processing program to help his brother in-law’s practice, he soon realized he had a tool that could make home buying easier for many people. Thus, Simple Nexus was born. The program aims to help loan originators smooth interactions between borrowers and realtors. Hansen recently shared with Doug Wells how his app works, and the story behind how this hobby grew into a company.

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  • How Utah Draws Companies to the State on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    wasatch-mountainsThe Bottom Line (Air Date: December 6, 2016) – Utah has worked hard in recent years to diversify its economy and attract successful companies and good-paying jobs to the state. But the process drew attention and controversy recently with a proposed deal to lure a Facebook data center to West Jordan, Utah. What benefits and drawbacks might these kinds of deals bring? What does the process of deal-making for economic development between companies and government entities usually look like?

    This week we hosted a panel discussion about economic development in Utah and how state and local municipalities work together to offer incentives aimed at attracting companies to relocate or expand here. Theresa Foxley, Deputy Director of the Governor’s Office of Economic Development, talks about the state’s holistic strategies and goals for corporate recruitment. Mike Caldwell, Mayor of Ogden City, speaks about the strategies behind Ogden’s ambitions to develop its economy around outdoor recreation and advanced manufacturing. Mark DeYoung, CEO of Vista Outdoors, describes the formulaic process of decision-making his company took before choosing to locate to Utah. Vista Outdoors, a year publicly traded company, was offered a tax credit of up to $1.35 million dollars over 7 years to base the firm’s new headquarters here in Utah.

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  • Keeping Flying J Aloft – Crystal Call Maggelet, CEO of FJ Management on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    img_5309The Bottom Line (Air Date: November 30, 2016) – In the early 2000s, Flying J was one of the nation’s largest and most successful chains of travel plazas and fuel stops. But the company faced dire circumstances and Chapter 11 bankruptcy after the 2008 financial crisis when fuel costs plummeted. Crystal Call Maggelet, CEO of FJ Management, was forced to make difficult decisions to keep her company alive, including merging with her closest rival, Pilot Travel Centers. Pilot Flying J is now the largest source for over-the-road diesel fuel, and largest Travel Center chain in the country with over 550 locations.

    Maggelet’s father Jay Call founded Flying J in the early 1960s, and saw the business morph into a thriving, multi-state travel center business. Growing up amid her father’s successes, Crystal faced challenges and naysayers when she decided to launch her own hotel business – Crystal Inn – in downtown Salt Lake City, Utah. After the unexpected death of her father in a small plane crash, Maggelet would later assert the company’s pilot seat after Flying J’s CEO had expanded the company beyond its means and the Great Recession hit. Learn how Maggelett stabilized the sinking business, and repaid all of their debts despite serious doubts from their creditors.

    Along with managing the Pilot Flying J and the Crystal Inn chain, FJ Management oversees Big West Oil, which operates a petroleum refinery in North Salt Lake, the Maverik fuel and convenience store chain, and TAB Bank, an industrial loan chartered bank.

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  • Advancing Sustainability Culture in the Workplace – Bill Wilson, Sustain3, on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    DwellTekThe Bottom Line (Air Date: November 22, 2016) –Sustainability for a business has to be more than solar panels and office recycling. Effective sustainability projects involve changing behaviors. Bill Wilson is the Founder and President of Sustain3, a technology firm that helps companies encourage their employees to participate in setting and achieving sustainability goals.  Sustain3 provides a platform for companies to engage their employees with regular, short bursts of information to help them develop more environmentally-friendly habits. Little things like turning off computers and monitors before going home can generate significant savings for companies. Wilson also shares how he helped to introduce Benefit Corporations to Utah.

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  • Startup Santa: Addressing Early Childhood Literacy – Clint Betts, Beehive Startups on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    startupsantaThe Bottom Line (Air Date: November 15, 2016) – Host Doug Wells recently spoke with Clint Betts, founder and editor-in-chief of Beehive Startups, about Startup Santa, a book-drive challenge for Utah tech companies and businesses to raise books for low-income families. Betts says two out of every three Utah children living in low-income families and attending 3rd grade do not read at a proficient level. He says literacy and access to books at home at a young age is an important indicator of a child’s outlook for future academic and professional success.

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  • Making Robots Plow, Protect, Dig, and Clean – Mel Torrie, President and CEO of Autonomous Solutions on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    img_5287The Bottom Line (Air Date: November 8, 2016) – The dawning age of driver-less cars are much-discussed as of late. But what’s overlooked is also the rise of autonomous tractors, mining vehicles, and robots for cleaning and security. That is the industrial future that Mel Torrie, President and CEO of Autonomous Solutions Inc. (ASI), believes is several years away. ASI, based in Logan, Utah, develops and sells systems of robots for mining, military, agriculture, hazardous material handling, automotive proving grounds and industrial cleaning.

    Torrie’s journey began years ago with a vision for self-driving tractors to relieve the monotony and boredom of plowing massive fields. Torrie joined Utah State University robotics researchers prior to founding ASI about 15 years ago. While ASI has been perfecting driver-less tractors, they’ve also designed robots to help Ford test-crash their vehicles for safety. Torrie says his company can now even automate a fleet of mining vehicles in South Africa from its offices in Utah. And they have also teamed up with Sharp to design robots for cleaning and security.

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  • Gary Herbert, Utah’s Governor, on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    herbertThe Bottom Line (Air Date: November 1, 2016) – Republican Gary Herbert has already served as Utah’s Governor for 7 years, and he’s asking Utahns to elect him next week for 4 more years. In this interview Herbert discusses his thoughts on treating inequality and poverty in Utah, how the state should move forward on Medicaid expansion and healthcare, and corporate incentives to attract businesses to the state. The Governor also shares his thoughts on state education performance and funding,on how he thinks Utah’s public lands lawsuit will help the economy, and how the outdoor recreation industry relates to energy development.

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  • Contact Sport: CEO, Brian Bethers on the Battled Rise of 1-800 Contacts on KCPW''s The Bottom LIne

    img_5281The Bottom Line (Air Date: October 18, 2016) –When two idealistic entrepreneurs – John F. Nichols and Johnathan C. Coon – launched 1-800 Contacts in the mid-1990s, they realized they had a serious ‘Supply and Demand’ problem. On the supply side, contact lens manufacturers didn’t want to sell to them. On the demand side, consumers couldn’t buy from them without an eye doctor’s prescription. Thus began a series of drawn out and complicated legal battles waged in the halls of Congress and state houses to neighborhood optometry clinics. More than two decades later 1-800 Contacts now sells over 200,000 contact lenses on an average day. They call themselves the “World’s Largest Contact Lens Store”.  Yet despite (or because of) their successes, the Utah-based company still faces legal struggles with optometrists and with protecting its trademark interests.

    Recently Host Doug Wells spoke with Brian Bethers, the CEO and Chairman of the Board of 1-800 Contacts, based in Draper, Utah. Bethers shares how the company fought early on to disrupt the contact lens industry where contact lens manufacturers like Johnson & Johnson and optometrists were limiting how patients could purchase contact lenses, and what brands they could buy. The company also lobbied hard to change state and Federal laws to require eye doctors to provide patients with copies of their vision prescriptions. Yet, even since passage of the 2004 Fairness to Contact Lens Consumers Act, Bethers says many optometrists still refuse to share prescriptions. Bethers also talks about 1-800 Contacts’ successful partnership with Walmart until 2012, lessons he learned from working for the Marriott Corporation, and the importance of having a persistent legal strategy when disrupting an established industry.

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  • Mike Weinholtz, Democratic Candidate for Utah Governor, on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    img_5235The Bottom Line (Air Date: October 11, 2016) – Mike Weinholtz believes he has better ideas and better policy solutions to help Utah’s economy thrive than Governor Gary Herbert. Weinholtz is the Democratic candidate for governor. He was formerly CEO of CHG Healthcare, one of the largest healthcare staffing companies in the U.S. In this interview Weinholtz shares his thoughts on fixing income inequality and whether to increase minimum wage. He also talks about Medicaid expansion, economic development, the state’s public lands lawsuit, and how to improve education standards in Utah, among other topics. We have scheduled an interview with Governor Gary Herbert on The Bottom Line in the coming weeks.

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  • From Headphones to Wood-Fired Grills: Jeremy Andrus, CEO of Traeger Grills, on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    img_5213The Bottom Line (Air Date: October 4, 2016) – Before Jeremy Andrus discovered Traeger Wood Pellet Grills through a search fund, he had successfully helped to lift Skullcandy as its CEO from $1 million dollars in annual sales to over $300 million dollars before eventually taking the company public. But Traeger proved to be a very different challenge for Andrus. It was a small business with tremendous potential, but its culture needed a drastic overhaul. The company also struggled with competition – after its patent protection had expired. What’s more, Andrus discovered serious IP and embezzlement issues with their manufacturing partner in China. In this interview with host Doug Wells, Jeremy Andrus talks about how he has helped Traeger become a recognizable brand, his decisions to take risks at certain times, his experiences marketing Traeger through Costco, Home Depot and Youtube online, and how he balances work and family obligations.

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  • Bryan Brandenburg – Artist, Game Designer, and Co-founder of Salt Lake Comic Con on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    image1The Bottom Line (Air Date: September 27, 2016) –Few events have suddenly turned so wildly popular – and profitable – as Salt Lake Comic Con. The state of Utah estimates the economic benefit from Salt Lake Comic Con’s inaugural event in 2013 at over $30 million dollars. The events continue to attract hundreds of thousands of costumed enthusiasts, and break comic book convention attendance records.

    This amazingly successful event for Salt Lake was launched sort of unexpectedly by co-founders Bryan Brandenburg and his partner Dan Farr. Host Doug Wells spoke recently with Brandenburg about his early career as an artist, entrepreneur and game designer. In the first half of the interview Brandenburg shares some highlights of his life journey prior to Comic Con. He talks about his early work as a programmer and game designer for Sculptured Software in the mid-1980s, and later designing game titles for Software Arts International. He also pioneered an outdoor media company with Utah Jazz superstar Karl Malone, and designed anatomy and other visualization programs as an executive at DAZ 3D.  Brandenburg also talks about his obsession with time travel and the possibility of anti-aging technology.

  • A Better Heavy Equipment Tracker – Alain Eav, RoviTracker, on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    RoviTrackerStartup Spotlight (August 2016) — RoviTracker is a rental management software to help companies that use heavy equipment rent and track their inventory. CEO and Founder Alain Eav, says he developed the program after years of dealing with some frustrations managing an equipment rental fleet. Eav shares how his former company Mobilight International in Utah agreed to be his first pilot customer to track their equipment, and how he hopes his company will support the oil and gas, mining, and construction industries. RoviTracker was recently part of Boom Startup‘s Spring 2016 cohort.

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  • Empowering Mom-and-Pop Grocers – Matt Garner, ShopHero on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    shopheroStartup Spotlight (August 2016) — ShopHero is a new company that offers an online service for local independent grocers to compete with the big national retailers. Because independent grocers must compete now with large retailers that offer home deliveries, ShopHero aims to empower the smaller guys. CEO Matt Garner shares how the company is based in Provo, Utah, and has been operating for a year, piloting a project with a local Reams Food Store in Springville, Utah. Shophero was recently part of Boom Startup‘s Spring 2016 cohort.

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  • Getting Your Data Together – Mike Van Thiel, Known Factors, on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    knownfactorsStartup Spotlight (August 2016) — Known Factors is an analytics, cloud-based program designed to help mid-tier companies to manage all of their data resources together into a single, dynamic system. CEO Mike Van Thiel says Known Factors ideally works in conjunction with other SAAS programs like DOMO, Tableau, Yellow Fin, to help companies more easily manage their data. Known Factors was recently part of Boom Startup‘s Spring 2016 cohort.

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  • Helping You Journal – Nick Jones, JRNL, on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    jrnlStartup Spotlight (August 2016) — JRNL is an application to help people get in the habit of journal writing and recording their own lives by using texts, emails, and social media. CEO and Founder Nick Jones says that while journal writing was once considered a private, even hidden exercise, social media has made journaling more public and fundamentally changed how people keep records about their lives. JRNL is designed to help people more easily write, share and keep meaningful journals, even as physical books if users want. JRNL was recently part of Boom Startup‘s Spring 2016 cohort.

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  • Learning By Gaming – Clancy Marshall, Cleverywhere, on KCPW's The Bottom LIne

    CleverywhereStartup Spotlight (August 2016) — Clancy Marshall, CEO of Cleverywhere, says declining test scores on standardized tests and general disinterest in school by American students was the impetus for launching her company. Clancy says she hired game designers from Halo and Minecraft, and partnered them with teachers and top pedagogical scientists to design effective educational games.  She believes truly engaging games can improve test scores and actually make learning fun. Cleverywhere was recently part of Boom Startup‘s Spring 2016 cohort.

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  • Learning Chinese By Pictures – Lukas Lohove, Zizzle, on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    zizzleStartup Spotlight (August 2016) — Lukas Lohove has created a application called Zizzle to help Mandarin Chinese language learners more effectively learn Chinese characters by telling stories through pictures. Lohove says his app can help a variety of learners, by making the process fun and time-saving. Increasingly young and old Americans see Chinese as an important language to know. Lohove says Utah is currently no. 1 in the U.S. for Chinese immersion education. Zizzle was recently part of Boom Startup‘s Spring 2016 cohort.

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  • Personalizing How We Teach & Learn – Jeffrey Katzman, Core Learning Exchange, on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    core learning exchangeStartup Spotlight (August 2016) — Core Learning Exchange CEO and Founder Jeffrey Katzman says current platforms used in most K-12 education are designed to support a “factory-style” of education setup in the last century. Core Learning Exchange, on the other hand, aims to help educators to individualize instruction for each student. With more personalized learning approaches, Katzman says he hopes Core Learning Exchange with its “mastery-based” approach can contribute to a revolution in how we educate our children. Core Learning Exchange was recently part of Boom Startup‘s Spring 2016 cohort.

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  • Streamlining The Sales Process – Joe Lowry, Salesbridge, on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    SalesbridgeStartup Spotlight (August 2016) — Research shows that a quality personal interaction and a quick follow-up are key to closing a sale. Joe Lowry is CEO and Founder of Salesbridge, a SAS-based platform that automates scheduling, data entry, and follow up, to help salespeople better interact with customers. Lowry talks about how his platform works, and his background working in sales. Salesbridge was recently part of Boom Startup‘s Spring 2016 cohort.

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  • Tracking Your Utilities in Real-time – Sumner Douglas, Vutiliti, on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    vutilitiStartup Spotlight (August 2016) — Vutiliti is an application that will provide people with real-time analytics and data about their use of electricity, gas, and water. Sumner Douglas, the company’s COO, says homeowners have long wanted access to real-time utility data in order to conserve and save money. Douglas says they estimate their product could save homeowners $40 to $80 a month in utility usage. Vutiliti is now running a pilot in Park City, Utah, and hope to have the application available across Utah by 2017. Vutiliti was recently part of Boom Startup‘s Spring 2016 cohort.

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  • Estate Planning & Legal Advice for Aspiring Entrepreneurs — Scott McCullough, Attorney

    mcculloughThe Bottom Line – (Air date: June 7, 2016) Scott McCullough is a partner at Callister Nebeker & McCullough.  He specializes in business law, asset protection and estate planning, but he also advises entrepreneurs who are building their own companies.  Company founders are wise to seek professional advice early in their journey.  Important decisions should be made early on for how wealth can be created or shared among co-founders, or — if things don’t go well — how much financial responsibility an entrepreneur will have.


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  • Search Fund Experience — Todd Tracey, HemaSource on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    The Bottom Line – (Air date: May 31, 2016) Most of the CEOs we chat with founded their own companies.  Todd Tracy’s path was different.  He started what is known as a search fund – a vehicle where investors back a promising entrepreneur to search for, buy and ultimately run a strong company with untapped growth opportunities.  Todd’s investors are no doubt satisfied.  In just 4 years, Todd’s investors netted 5 times their money.  The company they funded was HemaSource, a company that supplies many of the products health centers need when delivering blood therapies to patients such as disinfectants, gloves, gauze, and donor screening products. In 2014, HemaSource was sold to a private equity firm determined to buy this best of breed West Valley firm.  In this program Todd Tracey discusses his search fund experience, and how his team  grew HemaSource into a leader in their $500 million dollar disposable medical products industry. Todd has since moved on from the CEO seat but remains on the HemaSource Board of Directors.

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  • Prospering In Pest Control — David Royce, Aptive Environmental

    The Bottom Line – (Air date: May 24, 2016)  While only in his mid 30s, David Royce has already built and successfully sold three companies. His business is pest control.  Despite little training as a rookie starting out, David quickly rose to be a top salesman. His plan had been to be an investment banker, but that changed when his boss offered to sell him licensing for Moxie Pest Control in Southern California. By 2008, David grew Moxie to over $10M in sales prior to its acquisition. Next, he went to Las Vegas to start EcoFirst Pest Control which he built to over $24 million in sales in just 3 years.  The next year, in 2012, he started Alterra Pest Control in Utah and built that to over $75M in sales prior to selling this last fall.  At the time of its sale, Alterra employed over 400 employees across 16 states. Alterra’s headquarters even enjoyed modern glass-enclosed offices, ping pong tables, and a full length basketball court.  All three of his companies were acquired by Terminix. Royce’s new company, Aptive Environmental is destined to become his biggest venture yet. Royce shares his thoughts on key decisions that helped his pest control businesses survive in a brutally competitive industry.

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  • Enhancing the Customer Experience — Carine Clark, CEO of MaritzCX

    CarineClarkThe Bottom Line – (Air date: May 10, 2016)  Carine Clark is the President & CEO of MaritzCX, a company that uses comprehensive data to help businesses with customer relationships. Before her arrival at MaritzCX, Clark encountered the who’s who of tech startup entrepreneurs while trekking along her winding career path.  Carine spent over a decade working at Novell, before joining what was then a fledgling startup called Altiris. She later became Chief Marketing Officer at Symantec (then the nation’s 3rd largest software company). Clark lead Allegiance Software which was ultimately purchased by Maritz Holdings in late 2014. The new company became MaritzCX which employs over 1,000 full-time employees.  Carine Clark discusses some of her personal challenges, including a decision to quit school and surviving cancer.  She also reflects on her ability to tell people exactly what she thinks.

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  • Managing the Business of Nuclear Waste — Greg Wood, CFO of Energy Solutions

    gregwoodThe Bottom Line – (Air date: May 3, 2016) Safe storage of hazardous nuclear waste is an enormous problem in the U.S.  Options for long-term storage of nuclear waste are very limited. The U.S. continues to generate waste from nuclear power plants across the country which demands extremely cautious disposal. Managing this problem makes for a unique business for Utah-based Energy Solutions.  Recently Host Doug Wells spoke to Greg Wood, the Chief Financial Officer of Energy Solutions.  The company is the country’s largest nuclear waste firm and employs more than 4,000 people.  The U.S. has only three commercial landfills for nuclear waste, and Energy Solutions’ site in Utah’s West Desert in Tooele County is the nation’s busiest.  Prior to going private in 2013, Energy Solutions reported revenues of just under $2B dollars. Wood talks about his experiences with managing the company’s finances.

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  • Obligated to Give Back: Bassam Salem, Founder of Mindshare Ventures

    IMG_4342The Bottom Line – (Air date: April 19/26, 2016) Bassam Salem immigrated to the U.S. from Egypt as a young kid. Despite currents of prejudice and discrimination flowing against him, Salem rose to become a successful entrepreneur and software engineer in Utah.  He has been a senior executive at several prominent Utah companies, including inContact, Siebel Systems, Atensity, and Omniture.  Until just a few months ago, Salem was the Chief Operating Officer at MaritzCX, a technology firm in the fast growing space of customer surveys.  But he has now foundedMindshare Ventures, transitioning himself into a field he is passionate about — helping other entrepreneurs and startups to optimize their own creativity.  Aside from talking about his experiences in the tech community, Salem shares his feelings of obligation to help others provide for their own children and themselves.  He also talks about his admiration for what smaller teams can create and achieve, and the importance of being an authentic person.

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  • Enhancing the Vacation Rental Space — Julian Castelli, CEO of Leisure Link, on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    IMG_4313The Bottom Line – (Air date: April 4, 2016) Julian Castelli is the CEO of Leisure Link, a national leader in the vacation rental space, one of the most challenging and fast changing industries in the country.  Leisure Link’s platform helps vacation rental property managers operate more effectively.  In this interview with Doug Wells, Castelli describes how he originally purchased the company from Overstock.com, how his company survived the Great Recession period, and how he worked to acquire its first major client Park City Mountain Resort. Castelli also shares his thoughts about the disrupted vacation rental market, and how his company has managed to make lemonade out of lemons in today’s new vacation landscape.

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  • Steering a Supermarket Giant – Victor Lund, former CEO of American Stores Company on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    IMG_4309The Bottom Line – (Air date: March 22, 2016) By the late 1980s American Stores was the largest drug-store retailer in the United States and the third-largest grocery retailer in the country. The company operated Acme Markets on the East Coast and Alpha Beta on the West Coast. Among the business leaders steering the company’s decisions was Victor Lund, who is former Chairman & CEO of The American Stores Company.

    In his interview with Doug Wells, Victor describes how the company was originally acquired and managed by Sam Skaggs and headquartered in Salt Lake City, Utah. During Lund’s 22-year career with American Stores Company he served in various positions. He talks about the company’s hostile takeover of the supermarket chain Jewel Companies in 1984, and shares his thoughts about such hostile takeovers.  American Stores’ acquisition of California’s Lucky Stores chain in 1988 became an anti-trust case that ultimately was settled by the Supreme Court. Lund talks about the company’s decisions to stay competitive in the early 1990s. American Stores became so big that it ultimately sold to Albertson’s for id="mce_marker"1.7 billion dollars in 1998.

    Victor Lund also talks about his experience serving board of directors for some of the nation’s largest companies including Delta Airlines, where he helped the company survive its 2005 bankruptcy. Lund has also served on the boards of Del Monte FoodsMariner Health Care and the small startup Bill Me Laterthat was sold to eBay. Later in the interview Lund shares his thoughts on Walmart, the skills needed to be a CEO, and how he has balanced his professional career with his family and raising children.

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  • Inside the Business of Long Distance Relay Racing on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    IMG_4142The Bottom Line – (Air date: March 15 ~22, 2016) TheRagnar is relay race born in Utah that has since become a wildly popular event among folks who love the challenge and adrenaline of long distance running.  Ragnar is a 24-hour, nearly 200 mile relay race and typically run in teams of 12 people.  The Wasatch Back edition – which stretches from Logan to Midway, Utah – was Ragnar’s original race route.  Tanner Bell is the co-founder of Ragnar Events.  He and his two co-founders, Steve and Dan Hill – a father-and-son team – started Ragnar as a dream and have since grown the company into a leading organizer of some of the nation’s most popular ultra-distance running races.

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  • The Eccles Family Legacy – An Interview with Spencer P. Eccles on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    IMG_4145The Bottom Line – (Air date: March 1 ~8, 2016) Few families have done more to make Utah a better place to live, work and play than the Eccles family. The Eccles’ various foundations have touched the lives of thousands of families in Utah and nationwide. As The Bottom Line show celebrates its third year on KCPW, we welcomed Spencer P. Eccles as our guest.

    Spencer describes how his great grandfather David Eccles immigrated to Utah from Scotland and managed to become a successful railroad man. He also describes the accomplishments of his great uncles Marriner S. and George S. Eccles who built and sustained the First Security Corporation through the Great Depression. Marriner Stoddard Eccles served on the Federal Reserve board from 1934 to 1951. Spencer P.’s father, Spencer Fox Eccles later took over First Security Corporation and sold it to Wells Fargo in 2000. Spencer talks about his own experiences as a competitive ski racer, and his opportunity to prepare the Snow Basin venue for the 2002 Winter Olympic Games. He reflects on his position as Executive Director of the Governor’s Office of Economic Development (GOED) for the State of Utah, and his current work as Managing Director of The Cynosure Group.

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  • Tom Stockham of Experticity--The Art of Influencing Consumer Choices on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    stockhamThe Bottom Line – Consumers seem to pay less and less attention to traditional marking. Instead, people buy products that come recommended by authentic people they can trust. That’s the reason, Stockham says, so-called “infuencer marking” is now hotter than ever. Stockham is CEO of Experticity, a Salt Lake City-based company that is a pioneer in the field of influencer marketing. His clients include over 600 of the world’s top brands including Garmin, North Face, Dillard, Under Armor, REI and Dyson. Experticity helps these companies to foster deeper connections with their customers by educating product experts and brand enthusiasts who can influence sales. Stockham also talks about his past experience as CEO of Ancestry.com, President of TicketMaster.com, and the general manager of CitySearch – one the Internet’s early success stories. He also describes his father’s pioneering work to digitize sound.

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  • Johnny Hanna of Homie on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    JohnnyprofilepicThe Bottom Line – People have tried to disrupt the residential real estate broker market for decades. The estimated $100B per year industry has remained stubbornly resistant to changes. But Johnny Hanna believes the stars have aligned for a change now, and he hopes to instigate it with his online platform called Homie. His startup works to help home-sellers and buyers find new homes more efficiently, and it saves them money by cutting the real estate agent out of the equation all together. Johnny Hannah is ex-President of Property Solutions which grew to over $100M per year in revenues and a valuation north of $1 billion dollars.

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  • Geralyn Dreyfous – Filmmaking as Cultural Entrepreneurship on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    IMG_3846The Bottom Line – Geralyn Dreyfous has had an impressive career as an award-winning Executive Producer of documentary films, including “Born into Brothels” (2004), “the Cove” (2010), and “Hell and Back Again” (2011).  She, along with co-founder Dan Cogan launched Impact Partners in 2007 which has since supported over 60 films.  With the 2016 Sundance Film Festival now weeks away, Geralyn again will have several documentary films screening.  She speaks with Doug Wells about the work of documentary film-producing as an act of cultural entrepreneurship.

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  • Ed-Tech Series: Adi Thacker, WriteWell on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    Startup Spotlight – Recently a cohort of talented and aspiring entrepreneurs completed Boom Startup’s 2015 Ed-Tech accelerator program.  Adi Thacker is the founder of WriteWell, an app that works to help people become better writers.

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  • Ed-Tech Series: Jordan Townsend, Circll on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    CircllStartup Spotlight – Continuing our series of interviews with aspiring entrepreneurs who completed Boom Startup’s 2015 Ed-Tech accelerator program, Doug spoke with Jordan Townsend, founder of Circll.  He has developed an app to help public school raise funds.




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  • Ed-Tech Series: Kati Radziwon, iFlipd on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    iflipdStartup Spotlight – Continuing our series of interviews with a cohort of talented and aspiring entrepreneurs completedBoom Startup’s 2015 Ed-Tech accelerator program: Kati Radziwon is the CEO and founder of iFlipd, a company that aims to be the “Redbox of ebooks”.  Their service hopes to create a community where like-minded readers can “meet, mingle, and exchange ideas, recommend, and rail against” books.

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  • Ed-Tech Series: Patrice Laperriere , Zamenhof on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    ZamenhofStartup Spotlight – Continuing our series of interviews with aspiring entrepreneurs who completed Boom Startup’s 2015 Ed-Tech accelerator program, Doug spoke with Patrice Laperriere, Founder of Zamenhof.  His company aims to be a better foreign language learning program.

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  • Ed-Tech Series: Peter Glenn, Crowd School on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    crowdschoolStartup Spotlight – Recently a cohort of talented and aspiring entrepreneurs completed Boom Startup’s 2015 Ed-Tech accelerator program.  Peter Glenn is the co-founder and CEO of Crowd School a software designed to help teachers create and share ideas and plan lessons for project-based learning.

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  • Ed-Tech Series: Ross Jones, Emotuit on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    emotuitStartup Spotlight – Recently a cohort of talented and aspiring entrepreneurs completed Boom Startup’s 2015 Ed-Tech accelerator program.  Ross Jones is the CEO of Emotuit, a software that uses facial expression recognition to understand when a student is, or isn’t engaged with certain content online content.  His company hopes to provide a new form of innovative data to help educators improve how they teach.

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  • Ed-Tech Series: Maria Ortiz, 7 Generation Games on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    7GenGames-LogoStartup Spotlight – Recently a cohort of talented and aspiring entrepreneurs completed Boom Startup’s 2015 Ed-Tech accelerator program.  Maria Ortiz is the CEO and Co-Founder of 7 Generation Games, a video game that hopes to change how math is learned by combining Native American history and adventure gaming.

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  • A Safe Place to Fail – Troy D’Ambrosio, Lassonde Entrepreneur Institute on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    IMG_3789The Bottom Line – 2016 is set to be an exciting year for Utah students studying entrepreneurship.  The University of Utah’s new Lassonde Studios will open as a 20,000 square-foot center that combines living space for 400 full-time residents, multiple classrooms and innovation laboratories.  It is one of the nation’s biggest and boldest programs in entrepreneurship education.
    Princeton Review recently recognized both the U’s Undergraduate and Graduate Programs among the country’s Top 25 programs in Entrepreneurship.  Troy D’Ambrosio is Executive Director of the Lassonde Entrepreneur Institute at the University of Utah.  He shares the program’s ambitions, the background of philanthropist/donor Pierre Lassonde, plus Troy D’Ambrosio talks about his own background as an entrepreneur.

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  • Line: Keeping the Family’s Values Alive – Gail Miller, Owner of the Larry H Miller Group of Companies on KPCW's The Bottom Line

    IMG_3768The Bottom Line – Gail Miller assumed the reins of her late husband’s Group of Companies after Larry died in 2009.  A professional softball player, Larry H Miller’s business empire began in 1979 when he bought his first Toyota dealership in Murray, Utah.  He soon acquired more dealerships and even the Utah Jazz basketball franchise.  Today he is still beloved for keeping the then struggling Jazz in Utah.  Larry Miller died in 2009, but today his Group of Companies includes more than 80 businesses and employs over 10,000 people in 46 states.  Gail Miller now has the challenging task of overseeing the massive and diverse Miller family business enterprise, including Larry H. Miller Charities.  Keeping the Miller family’s values integral to their businesses has been crucial to their success, she says.

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  • Binding A Better Tape, Reed Quinn, Founder of KT Tape and FiberFix, on KCPW's the Bottom Line

    ReedThe Bottom Line – When the Summer Olympics in Brazil commence in less than 9 months we may likely again see the world’s best athletes sporting brightly colored tape on their thighs, shoulders and buttocks.  This tape is known as “Kinesiology tape” and its fans are convinced that it helps with sports injury recovery.  KT Tape, based in Lindon, Utah, is one of the leading brands in this market.  Reed Quinn launched the company with family members.  He is a serial entrepreneur and also the founder of FiberFix.   FiberFix was featured on Shark Tank and is sold in thousands of hardware stores across the nation.

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  • Crafting a Supreme Ski Experience – Bob Wheaton, President of Deer Valley Resort, on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    bobwheatonThe Bottom Line – Bob Wheaton, President of Deer Valley Resort, has worked at the resort since 1981.  The resort has long prioritized customer service and hospitality.  Between 2007 and 2011, Deer Valley was ranked #1 as the best ski resort in all of North America by Ski Magazine.  Wheaton talks about his experience managing the resort during the 2002 Winter Olympics and the future ambitions of Deer Valley.

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  • Helping Companies Give Back – Purpose Portfolio Co-Founder SaraJoy Pond, on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    SaraJoy-PondStartup Spotlight – SaraJoy Pond is Co-Founder of a new startup called Purpose Portfolio. Purpose Portfolio aims to help companies give back to charities and nonprofits working to make the world a fairer, safer, cleaner place.  Their software platform works to help firm energize their workforce and easily let employees contribute to vetted charities of their choice.

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  • Building a Model HR Culture – Ben Peterson, CEO of BambooHR, on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    BenPetersonThe Bottom Line – Founded in the summer of 2008,BambooHR provides HR software for small and mid-size companies.  In just 7 years, the company has grown to approximately 100 employees, serves clients in over 80 countries and works with an impressive list of clients – including Lyft, FitBit and SoundCloud.  Towards the end of 2014, BambooHR was recognized as the Best Small Company to work for in Utah beating out well know firms like Tanner LLC and Grant Thornton.  In this interview Ben Peterson, CEO of BambooHR, shares how he and his co-founder Ryan Sanders, beat the financial crisis and built a company that they and their employees are proud of.

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  • Advancing Television’s New Paradigm – Jim Sorenson, Chairman and Founder of Sorenson Media, on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    JimSorensonThe Bottom Line – James Lee Sorenson is a serial entrepreneur who has founded and run several large companies in his career, including Sorenson Media.  If you have ever watched video on an Apple device or YouTube, you have used his company’s video compression technology.  Jim founded Sorenson Media in 1995 after seeing this technology’s potential at Utah State University where it was developed.  He shares some of his early interactions with Apple founder Steve Jobs.  And he discusses how the company is now making televisions “smarter” by making them content aware.  And now Sorenson Media is pushing television into a new paradigm by partnering with local broadcasters in Salt Lake City to make TV viewing a more interactive experience.  Jim also started Sorenson Communications in the mid-90’s which dramatically improved the lives of deaf customers by helping them communicate electronically.  The idea of “doing well by doing good” has influenced how Jim views Philanthropy.  In 2013 Jim donated $13 million to the University of Utah to start the Sorenson Global Impact Investing Center at the David Eccles School of Business.

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  • Simplifying the Immigration Process – Sam Stoddard, Simple Citizen, on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    SimpleCitizenStartup Spotlight – Sam Stoddard encountered the byzantine U.S. immigration system a few years ago as he prepared to marry his fiance from Korea.  Immigration is a $48 billion industry monopolized by lawyers who can charge you up to $2,000 just to file one vital document.  It also can be a long and emotionally-charged process. So Stoddard imagined an online do-it-yourself tool to streamline the immigration process for people needing to submit basic immigration forms.  Simple Citizen was born.  2015 has already been an incredible year for Stoddard and his co-founders Brady Stoddard and Ayde Soto, who won the $100,000 Judge’s Grand Prize and $25,000 Audience Choice award at the recent StartFest entrepreneurial celebration.  They also won a $40,000 grand prize at this year’s Utah’s Entrepeneurial Challenge, were part of Boomstartup’s summer cohort of early stage companies, and were recently selected as the first company accepted into Beehive Startup’s “StartStudio”.

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  • Getting Your Business Found Online – Boostability’s Travis Thorpe on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    TravisThorpe&DougWellsThe Bottom Line – During the depths of the financial crisis Travis Thorpe and his partner Jared Turner thought the time was right to start a company to help other small companies gain visibility online through Search Engine Optimization, or SEO.  It is a process to help companies rank higher in online search results.  Show up in the top three or four listings and Google can be one of your best marketing channels.  But don’t hold your breath for a customer if you end up on the second page of a search engine.  SEO is high value work and often times yields big results. So how did Travis and Jared’s company do in its first 12 months?  Their company Boostability earned less than ten thousand dollars in revenue that year. Many entrepreneurs would have given up.  But they stuck with it and three short years later their company earned just over $22 million in sales.  They now employ over 500 people and are considered one of the best SEO optimization firms in the nation.

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  • Making Traffic Systems Smarter – Mark Pittman’s Blyncsy on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    IMG_3586Startup Spotlight – We all perhaps understand the frustration of sitting in an idling car waiting for an uncoordinated traffic light to change at an empty intersection.  Aspiring entrepreneur Mark Pittman thinks his business idea – Blyncsy – yields a solution.  Blyncsy proposes to make it easier for municipalities to minimize congestion by digitally conducting complex traffic studies literally every second of every day. It gathers data to help municipalities optimizing traffic light infrastructure.  But Blyncsy’s capabilities may actually be much bigger.  While still very much an early stage company, their initial customer list includes the University of Utah and Park City.

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  • Navigating the Legal Landscape – Wade Bean, Kunzler Law Group on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    Wade_BeanThe Bottom Line – Wade Bean is what is known as in the legal field as a “transaction attorney.” He makes deals happen. Bean is a corporate partner at the Kunzler Law Group in Salt Lake City.  Whether the matter is for first time startup funding, a major acquisition, or an IPO, companies and investors need attorneys like Bean.  In this program Wade Bean shares his thoughts on legal issues that routinely arise for companies experiencing growth.  For example, the importance of vesting, dealing with non-competes, and negotiating the acquisition of your company.

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  • Dr. Entrepreneur – Greg Warnock, Co-founder of Mercato Partners on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    gregwarnockThe Bottom Line – Greg Warnock has been an early investor in several of Utah’s most successful high growth companies including Skullcandy, Mediconnect, Fusion-IO and Domo.  He is Co-Founder and General Partner of the venture capital firm Mercato Partners. He also co-founded the Utah Community Foundation.  Warnock discusses how Mercato Partners stands out among comparable “growth capital investors” as he prefers to call it.  He also talks about the risks of over-investing in under-performing companies, and when to let them go.  He shares lessons he learned from being a programmer, how he managed to earn a PhD in Entrepreneurship at the University of Utah, and why Utah is able to grow strong companies.  And he talks about the importance of being a dad, and doing “dad class” with his kids to get them to learn from other professionals.

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  • Pattern Jam – Taking Quilting Online

    IMG_3400Startup Spotlight: A few years ago Emily Taylor, a nationally recognized quilt designer, saw a need for online tools to help other quilters map their projects.  Hence PatternJam.com was born.  And it turns out the quilting space is much larger than non-quilters would believe.  Building a quilt remains the creative outlet of choice for millions of Americans.  It takes a lot of time, skill and a fair amount of money.  And until PatternJam quilters had to mentally envision what the finished product would look like.  Even the most skilled quilters occasionally produced what Emily affectionately calls “an ugly quilt”.

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  • Start FEST 2015, Clint Betts of Beehive Startups on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    StartFest-StartSLCThe Bottom Line – Clint Betts visited KCPW recently to talk about the upcoming StartFEST event set to run from August 31 – September 5th in Provo, Utah.  Betts is the founder and editor-in-chief of Beehive Startups, an independent media organization covering Utah’s startup and tech scene.  When Betts was first a guest on The Bottom Line nine months ago he and his supporters were preparing to launch the inaugural StartSLC event at the Gateway Shopping Center.  The event attracted dozens of big name entrepreneurs, venture capitalist investors, and thousands of attendees.  Betts talks about the planned $150,000 pitch competition.  He also discusses Beehive’s latest project Start Studio, an early-stage startup studio that he hopes will work with founders across the country to help develop new products and launch scalable technology companies.

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  • Getting Utah Girls to Code, Utah Teacher Cody Henrichsen on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    cody_henrichsenThe Bottom Line – Only 102 Utah high school students took Advanced Placement (AP) Computer Science during the 2014/2015 school year. Cody Henrichsen taught 30 of them. The number of Utah youth studying computer science and coding is strikingly low compared to other states, even as demand for professional coders is rising. Girls are especially lagging when it comes to leaning computer programming. Nationwide less than 19 percent of students who took the AP exam were female. Henrichsen finds this unacceptable. Cody Henrichsen, a computer science programming instructor at the Canyons Technical Education Center. Since 2012 he also teaches a summer program focused on teaching teen aged girls how to code.

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  • Josh Coates, CEO of Instructure on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    joshcoatesThe Bottom Line – Whether you are a 3rd grader or a college Freshman, the classroom is increasingly online. Utah-based Instructure, and its flagship software product Canvas, is helping students, parents, teachers and administrative staff communicate seamlessly and share data easily using Cloud technology. Many years ago entrepreneurs like Josh Coates, Instructure’s CEO, recognized the massive education market would need better technology tools if teachers were going to prepare students for an ever-changing, face-paced and competitive landscape. Earlier this year, Instructure raised $40M at a valuation of over one-half a billion dollars. In total, Instructure has raised $90M and employs over 500 people. Canvas is one of the leading Learning Management Systems (LMS) for colleges, K-12 and now even the corporate training world. Coates discusses the beginnings of Instructure, how their software overcame its repressive rival Blackboard, how he came to lead the endeavor, and what it means to be a coder.

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  • Randy Hales, CEO of ZAGG on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    IMG_3274The Bottom Line – Randy Hales took over the helm of ZAGG, a publicly traded company based in Salt Lake City, in 2012. He has since helped steer the company to become a market leader in screen protectors for hand-held devices and tablet keyboards. They sell over one-quarter of a billion dollars worth of protective covers and accessories each year. Hales, who is ZAGG’s CEO and President, talks with Doug Wells about ZAGG’s culture, making a decision to take a company public, and what it’s like to anticipate and develop accessory products for leading tech companies like Apple.

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  • James Mayfield, Co-Founder of CHOICE Humanitarian on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    James-MayfieldThe Bottom Line –Forty years ago James Mayfield saw the challenges of extreme poverty around the globe and decided to do something. Today CHOICE Humanitarian is engaged in five countries: Kenya, Nepal, Bolivia, Guatemala and Mexico. working to end extreme poverty and “improve quality of life through a bottom-up, self-developing village-centered approach.” Although Mayfield says he is a “world class expert on what doesn’t work”, his organization has had profound impacts on the lives of many across the world.

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  • Davis Smith, Founder and CEO of Cotopaxi on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    DavidSmithThe Bottom Line – Davis Smith launched his new outdoor company Cotopaxi last year with a humanitarian mission. He set out to create a “Benefit Corporation” that could not only sell outdoor products, but fund sustainable poverty relief and “move people to do good.” Smith discusses the inception of his idea and his journey building its foundation. DavidSmithHe also discusses some of his earlier experiences creating the largest retailer of pool tables in the U.S., and the largest e-commerce site for baby products in Brazil.

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  • Sara Jones, Women Tech Council & Applicant Pro, on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    Sara-Dansie-JonesThe Bottom Line – Sara Dansie Jones is CEO of Applicant Pro – a software firm that simplifies the hiring process for companies. ApplicantPro has thousands of clients across the country and was recently named #25 on Mountain West Capital Network’s Top 100 list. She is also Co-founder of the Women Tech Council, a community of over 7,000 members actively engaged in supporting and encouraging women to enter and thrive in the tech industry.

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  • Taylor Randall, Dean of U of U’s Business School on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    TaylorRandallThe Bottom Line –  Taylor Randall became Dean of the University of Utah’s David Eccles School of Business in 2009.  The school now has a state of the art building and are moving up in the rankings of the best business schools in the nation.  The School is also eager to see the Lassonde Entrepreneur Institute open in August 2016.



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  • Mark Gorenberg, Founder of Zetta Ventures, on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    Gorenberg

    The Bottom Line –  Mark Gorenberg is the Founder and General Partner of Zetta Ventures.  Gorenberg has been successful at finding promising entrepreneurs and investing in developing trends.  He and his previous firm, Hummer Winblad were early investors into some of Utah’s most exciting companies including Omniture, InsideSales.com and Domo.  In addition, Gorenberg served on President Obama’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology.

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  • The Holodeck & Pando Labs Co-Working Spaces on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    Holodeck The Bottom Line – Co-working spaces for groups of entrepreneurs and startup companies to collaborate are becoming more popular across the Wasatch Front and Park City.  They provide a convenient place to work together as a team, hold important meetings and collaborate with other entrepreneurs.  Dan Might is co-founder of The Holodeck in Salt Lake City and Ted McAleer is Managing Director of Park City’s Pando Labs.  both are known as co-working spaces.

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  • Wesley Smith, Founder of Isomer Academy, on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    WesleySmithThe Bottom Line – A national lack of computer programmers is holding back growth and new products for many companies.  To address this dearth, coding boot camps are sprouting up across the country. These schools teach non-technical people entry level programming skills necessary for landing positions at technology companies. According to a 2014 study by Course Report, 75% of coding boot camp graduates are finding jobs with average salaries over 40% higher than their previous job.  Wesley Smith is Founder of the coding boot camp Isomer Academy based in Salt Lake City. He is starting an accelerator program LaunchCode this summer at Park City’s Pando Labs.

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  • Jay Bean, CEO of FreshLime, on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    JayBeanThe Bottom Line – You may not know of FreshLime yet, but if Jay Bean’s track record is any indication, it’s about to become one of Utah’s fastest growing companies.  Shortly after graduating from Weber State University Bean founded his first company, Ah-ha.com – an online marketing firm.  In just four short years he grew it to $35 million dollars a year in sales and sold it for just under $15 million dollars to Marchex.com. For an encore, he started OrangeSoda – another online marketing platform – and sold it in 2012 for almost $28 million dollars.  In his spare time he also operated a retail business selling sunglasses.  But Jay Bean’s entrepreneurial journey was not without its rocky moments.

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  • Vicki Farrar, Co-Founder of Catheter Connections, on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    VickiFarrarThe Bottom Line – (Air Date: March 10, 2015) Each year more than 500,000 patients in the U.S. suffer from intravascular (“I.V.”) catheter-related bloodstream infections.  It remains a serious problem, but one – for the most part – that can be solved. Catheter Connections focuses on the connection in the catheter that is often vulnerable for infection in hospitals. Vicki Farrar is the co-founder of Catheter Connections, which develops the “Dual Cap” – a technology developed in Utah.  Farrar discusses the complex process of developing and marketing a new medical technology and dealing with competitors.

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  • Parker Conrad, CEO of Zenefits, on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    ParkerConradThe Bottom Line (Air Date: March 3, 2015) –Last November Utah Insurance Commissioner Todd Kiser warned Parker Conrad’s San Francisco-based company Zenefits that they would be fined and banned from operating in Utah. The problem? Zenefits offers small businesses their cloud-based software for free, hoping they’ll purchase health benefits for their employees using Zenefits. This recurring commission is how the company makes most of its money, says Conrad, the company’s Founder and CEO. And it’s partly why the company is widely considered to be among the fastest growing SAAS companies ever to come out of Silicon Valley. Amazingly, less than 3 years after its founding, Zenefits has raised more than $80 million dollars at a rumored valuation of $500 million dollars. Although this disruptive business model is why some incumbent insurance brokers- such as in Utah – are crying foul, the state’s lawmakers are currently debating a bill (HB141) that would open Utah’s doors to Zenefits.

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  • Craig Earnshaw, BYU Professor of Entrepreneurship, on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    CraigEarnshawThe Bottom Line (Air Date: Feb. 24, 2015) – Craig Earnshaw’s journey as an entrepreneur began when Jimmy Carter was President and home mortgage rates were north of 10 percent. Twenty five years after he started Lifelink in 1978, Earnshaw had built his company into one of the country’s leading software companies for insurance agents. In 2004, he successfully sold it to publicly held EBIX. At the time of the sale, Lifelink had just 30 employees and was wildly profitable. Earnshaw is now adjunct professor of entrepreneurship at Brigham Young University and is an active angel investor and board member. On the side he has also summitted three of the World’s highest mountain peaks.

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  • Marcus Liassides, CEO of Sorenson Media, on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    Marcus_LiassidesThe Bottom Line – Sorenson Media began 20 years ago when it licensed technology from Utah State University. Back in 1995, America was just getting introduced to the Internet which, compared to today’s standards, was slow and limited. Sorenson embraced USU’s technology to allow us to watch streaming videos in real time (versus downloading the entire file first because the files were so large). Their technology was quickly adopted by brand name Fortune 500 companies like Apple Computers, Disney, Lucas Film, MGM and Paramount. In fact, if you’ve ever used Apple’s iTunes or QuickTime, you’ve likely used Sorenson Media’s compression technology. Marcus Liassides is President and CEO of Sorenson Media. Liassides describes the coming future of “smart” interactive televisions that will understand a viewer’s watching habits and share data with networks and content providers.

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  • Nathan Furr, BYU Professor of Entrepreneurship and Co-Author of The Innovators Method, on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    Nathan FurrThe Bottom Line (Air Date: February 3, 2015) – Nathan Furr is professor of entrepreneurship at Brigham Young University’s Marriott School of Business, and co-author of “The Innovator’s Method: Bringing the Lean Startup into Your Organization”. His book (co-authored with Jeff Dyer), examines processes of innovation and change that are valuable tools to know for large company executives, designers, software developers, and small startup entrepreneurs.

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  • Zach Mangum, Co-Founder of GroSocial, on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    ZachMangumThe Bottom Line (Air Date: January 20, 2015) – Zach Mangum’s journey from co-founding GroSocial to selling it took, amazingly, only two years. That said, his journey is not over. Zach sold his company to InfusionSoft in December of 2012 and now leads that company’s social products division. GroSocial had 30,000 users and nearly one million marketing leads a year customers at the time he sold the company. His client list included Internet leaders like Survey Monkey, Legal Zoom and Hubspot. Today, GroSocial’s service delivers over 4 million leads to its userbase of about 50,000 clients. InfusionSoft, his parent company, is also fast-growing. They recently closed a $55 million dollar round led by Bain Capital with participation by Goldman Sachs and Signal Peak Ventures. In total InfusionSoft has raised over $125 million and Fortune Magazine recently named the firm one of the top 20 medium sized firms to work for in the U.S.

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  • Mike Dutton, CEO of Winder Farms, on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    mikeduttonThe Bottom Line (Air Date: January 13, 2015) – Delivery vehicles for Winder Farms have traversed the Utah landscape since 1880. Not only was that before modern cars and trucks – it was long before electricity. Back then John Winder and his family delivered milk and butter mostly to neighbors and friends. The company stayed in the family until 2004 when two local investment firms, Dolphin Capital and Peterson Partners purchased Winder Dairy. Much has changed since 1880 but, remarkably, much has also stayed the same. Mike Dutton is Chief Executive Officer of Winder Farms. He says Winder still focuses on delivering farm fresh local food to its neighbors and friends – only the company now has a lot more friends. In 2013, Winder delivered over 10 million products to customers in Utah, Nevada and Southern California.

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  • Bryson Garbett, CEO of Garbett Homes, on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    BrysonGarbettThe Bottom Line (Air Date: December 30, 2014/January 6, 2015) – Bryson Garbett started his construction career in the field as a home framer when he was just 18 years old. He later founded Garbett Homesin 1988. Back then large homes on large lots were all the rage. Bryson saw a different opportunity and focused on affordable homes with quality amenities typically not seen at his price point. Over the past three decades, Garbett Homes has weathered several economic slumps and continues to thrive. In 2013, Garbett sold about 400 homes, half of them for-rent and half were outright sales. In addition, Bryson and his family have made a difference in the world by donating over $12 million dollars to various causes including supporting education for children in Mexico and women in Iraq. Bryson is also now engaging Salt Lake City’s homelessness problems with other concerned community members.

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  • Mike & Vanessa Dobson, Founders of Pop Art Gourmet Popcorn, on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    mike_venesaThe Bottom Line (Air Date: December 16, 2014) – You are not alone if you think gourmet popcorn is a niche business. Mike and Venessa Dobson first began making “fun seasoned” popcorn for friends, and later sold it at local farmers markets in the summer of 2011. By 2014, the couple had successfully placed their Pop Art Gourmet Popcorn into 75 local stores and had sold nearly 150,000 bags of popcorn. That is a lot of popcorn but still a relatively small business. But something magical is happening this year. Pop Art is now in over 1,000 stores nationwide and is on track to sell nearly half a million bags of popcorn in 2014 alone.

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  • Clint Betts, Founder and Editor-In-Chief of Beehive Startups & StartSLC, on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    Beehive-StartupsThe Bottom Line (Air Date: December 9, 2014) – Clint Betts is founder and editor-in-chief of Beehive Startups, an independent media organization focused on Utah’s startup and tech ecosystem. Clint and his team are also the driving force behind an exciting new event for entrepreneurs, investors and the broader community called StartSLC. The 3-day event will run from January 29-31st at The Gateway in Salt Lake City. It is free, open to the public and includes multiple sessions designed to bring entrepreneurs, want-to-be entrepreneurs, investors and the community together. The experience will culminate with a $250 thousand dollar “pitch competition” judged by a who’s who panel of Utah venture capitalists.

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  • Kent Thomas, Founder of Advanced CFO Solutions, on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    KentThomasThe Bottom Line (Air Date: November 25, 2014) – Any entrepreneur who is fortunate enough to have an idea grow into something worth tens of millions or even a billion dollars needs timely, accurate and actionable financial and business information to run their company. This information provides valuable feedback on what is going well, what needs to improve and strategically where the company should go next to thrive. This work is typically the job of a company CFO – a Chief Financial Officer. Unfortunately, most small and mid-sized companies simply cannot afford the services of fulltime experienced CFOs. This is something Kent Thomas realized several years ago, and he turned it into a profitable business idea. Thomas is the Founder and Chief Executive of Advanced CFO Solutions. They provide access to top-tier CFOs on a part time basis to companies who simply cannot afford a full-time CFO. Advanced CFO Solutions’ list of past clients include a “who’s who” of fast growing successful companies such as Ancestry.com, Skullcandy, Control4 and many more. In addition, Advanced CFO Solutions has helped over 200 clients raise over $1B in capital.

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  • Mark Clawson, CEO of Diamond Rental, on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    Mark ClawsonThe Bottom Line (Air Date: November 11, 2014) – Once the domain of relatively small mom and pop shops, the event rental business has grown up. It is now highly sophisticated and brings in over $5 billion dollars a year nationwide. One of the best-run regional players in the country is located here in Salt Lake City: Diamond Rental. In 1980, Maun Peterson and Lorin Winegar started Diamond Rental and ran it for 20-years prior to selling it to Mark Clawson and his partner. Mark left a promising law practice at one of the top law firms in the Bay Area, Wilson Sonsini – the same law firm that took Apple Computers and Google public – to run the company in Salt Lake City. Clawson has since led the company through spectacular growth.

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  • Gavin Christensen, Founder of Kick Start Seed Fund, on KCPW's The Bottom Line (Part 2)

    Gavin ChristensenThe Bottom Line (Air Date: November 4, 2014) – Twenty years ago during the dot-com boom, entrepreneurs in the Bay Area were turning away investors while companies in Utah were starving for capital. That has all changed now – thanks in large part to the efforts of Gavin Christensen, Founder and Managing Partner of Kickstart Seed Fund. This is the second half of Gavin’s interview with Doug Wells.

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  • Gavin Christensen, Founder of Kickstart Seed Fund, on KCPW's The Bottomw Line (Part 1)

    Gavin ChristensenThe Bottom Line (Air Date: October 28, 2014) – Twenty years ago during the dot-com boom, entrepreneurs in the Bay Area were turning away investors while companies in Utah were starving for capital. That has all changed now – thanks in large part to the efforts of Gavin Christensen, Founder and Managing Partner of Kickstart Seed Fund. Gavin, his partners at vSpring capital and a group of universities and outside limited partners saw the opportunity to build a healthy, cohesive and thriving entrepreneurial ecosystem. Kickstart’s first fund raised only $8 million in 2008. Their second fund was $26 million and their most recent fund just closed and is nearly $40 million.

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  • Dinesh Patel, Life Sciences Entrepreneur, on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    DrDineshPatelThe Bottom Line (Air Date: October 21, 2014) – After receiving his PhD in the 1980s and working for a large pharmaceutical company, Dinesh Patel realized he did not want to climb the corporate ladder. Instead he wanted to start his own company. His first firm, Theratech, was a huge success – going public after only 7-years and being sold for over $300 million dollars a few years later. At the time, Dinesh was not yet 50-years old and despite being a multi-millionaire, he didn’t see himself slowing down. Rather, he co-founded one of Utah’s first venture capital firms, vSpring (now Signal Peak Ventures) and got meaningfully involved in philanthropy. Due to his efforts Utah is a better place to start a company as well as a better place to enjoy the arts.

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  • Jeramy Lund & Robb Kunz, Angel Investors and Co-Sponsors of Park City Incubator, on KCPW's The Bottom Line (Part 2)

    BoomStartupLogo02102010pando

    The Bottom Line (Air Date: October 14, 2014) – Jeramy Lund and Robb Kunz are both seasoned entrepreneurs and angel investors who are co-sponsoring a business incubator called The Park City Project.  The project is to be run by both PandoLabs and Boomstartup.  In this episode, Lund and Kunz share their thoughts and suggestions for prospective business founders looking to launch their own business ideas.

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  • Jeramy Lund & Robb Kunz, Angel Investors and Co-Sponsors of Park City Incubator, on KCPW's The Bottom Line (Part 1)

    BoomStartupLogo02102010The Bottom Line (Air Date: October 7, 2014) – Jeramy Lund and Robb Kunz  are Active Angel investors and co-sponsors of The Park City Project, a business incubator run by bothPandoLabs and Boomstartup.  pandoBusiness incubators have been around for decades but have had mixed results at best.  But after 2005 that all changed, when an entrepreneur named Paul Graham believed that fairly young, technically savvy people could be taught many of the secrets of building a successful company.  Graham started Y-Combinator which has helped launch several of the most successful startups in the last decade including Dropbox, AirBnB, and Swipe as well as many other companies you may not have heard of.  Heroku sold to Salesforce.com and resulted in an estimated 400 times return for Y-Combinator in just three years.  Lund and Kunz hope their Park City Project will replicate that kind of success for Utah Startups.  This is Part One of a Two-Part interview.

     

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  • Richard Beard, CEO of Bank of American Fork, on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    RichardBeardThe Bottom Line (Air Date: September 16, 2014) – Bank of American Fork began when a farmer, a doctor, a pharmacist and a local merchant got together to start a local bank over a hundred years ago. The bank is now Utah’s largest community bank, and it has weathered not only the Great Recession but the Great Depression too. Richard Beard became the bank’s 9th president in 2004. He is also a member of the Board of Directors of People’s Utah Bancorp. He talks about what it means to be a community bank, and how he transitioned from being a lawyer to a banker. He shares his views on the negative image of bankers, and how Bank of American Fork has sought to overcome those perceptions. He also describes how his bank decided to embrace new trends and technologies such as mobile banking.

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  • Morgan Lynch, Founder & CEO of Needle, on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    Morgan-LynchThe Bottom Line (Air Date: September 9, 2014) – Several years ago Morgan Lynch envisioned a better way for companies to market products – by engaging their products’ biggest fans and committed users. Lynch started Needle in 2010 and his customers now include well-known companies like UnderArmor, Dell, Coach and Norwegian Cruise Lines. His company recruits people who are enthusiasts and expert users of a brand’s products. They work part-time and from their home, not from a call center. They are called “Needlers” and engage in online chats with potential customers. Online brands have seen conversion rates go from less than 1% to 10% or more when they can chat with an expert and fan of the product. Lynch talks about his experience working for Logoworks, and his efforts to develop his new model idea which became Needle.

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  • Peter Metcalf, CEO of Black Diamond, on KCPW's The Bottom Line (Part 2)

    The Bottom Line (Air Date: September 2, 2014) – In this second half of a two-part interview, Peter Metcalf describes Black Diamond’s decision to become a publicly traded company, and how the company’s commitment to environmentalism has helped it succeed. Metcalf also shares his life-altering and harrowing experience in 1980 of climbing Mt. Hunter with friends in 13 days with only six days worth of food. He also discusses his relationship with his father, and is relationship with his own children. Metcalf also talks about handing the company’s reins to Zeena Freeman who plans to succeed him as CEO by next year.

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  • Peter Metcalf, CEO of Black Diamond, on KCPW's The Bottom Line (Part 1)

    PeterMetcalfThe Bottom Line (Air Date: August 26, 2014) – In this first half of a two-part interview, Peter Metcalf describes how Black Diamond spawned from the small business created by mountain climber Yvon Chouinard in the 1960s. While Chouinard went on to found the outdoor retailing company Patagonia, Chouinard Equipment filed for bankruptcy and was reestablished by Metcalf as Black Diamond. The company now generates over $200 million dollars a year and trades as a publicly held company. Metcalf describes how the company moved from Ventura, California, to Salt Lake City, Utah, and set about improving what was crude climbing equipment to a “clean climbing” approach. He also shares the company’s philosophy on safety and culture, such as why Black Diamond voluntarily recalled tens of thousands of climbing axes when flaws were reported in 1993. Finally, Metcalf discusses his decision to step down as CEO in the coming year in order to commit more time to the climbing culture and community.

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  • David Elkington, CEO of InsideSales, on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    Dave-ElkingtonThe Bottom Line (Air Date: August 19, 2014) – David Elkington, Founder and CEO of InsideSales.com, is transforming the industry of inside sales – the business of working to sell products remotely by email or by phone. Elkington describes how his company’s technology works by collecting and analyzing huge amounts of predictive data on over 80% of the buyers in the United States. He talks about the 2009 “MIT study” that used InsideSales company data to examine when companies should call web-generated leads in order to increase the chances of closing a sale. The study has since profoundly influenced the industry. Elkington also discusses his educational background, and how he launched InsideSales with Ken Krogue and Rob Christensen in 2004. InsideSales now serves a client base of more than 1,000 customers including large sophisticated firms like Aflac, Fidelity, Microsoft and Groupon. In April 2014, InsideSales closed a $100 million dollar venture round, and was recently ranked #5 in the nation by Inc. Magazine for jobs created in the software industry.

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  • Paul Zane Pilzer, Serial Entrepreneur, on KCPW's The Bottom Line (Part 2)

    paulzanepilzerThe Bottom Line (Air Date: August 12, 2014) – In this second half of a two-part interview, Paul Zane Pilzer describes what he looks for when seeking young entrepreneurs with potential, such as 29-year-old Rick Lindquist, current CEO of Zane Benefits. Pilzer talks about his motivation to become an author, writing his book God Wants You To Be Rich, and the challenge of being a successful author now. He highlights his experiences working in the Reagan Administration as an economic advisor. Pilzer describes himself less as a businessman, and more as “an inventor and rainmaker” because of his drive to fix things and move on. He talks about his latest business venture, Zaniac that serves as an innovative math education program for young students. Finally he talks about the value of touring America’s prestigious college campuses with young children.

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  • Paul Zane Pilzer, Serial Entrepreneur, on KCPW's The Bottom Line (Part 1)

    paulzanepilzerThe Bottom Line (Air Date: August 5, 2014) – This is the first half of a two-part interview with Paul Zane Pilzer, one of Utah’s most successful serial entrepreneurs. Pilzer describes his climb from working as Citibank’s youngest officer at 22, to selling time share homes in the Hamptons in Long Island, NY, to selling real estate in Texas where he made his first million dollars. Pilzer then began teaching at New York University (where he taught for 21 years), meanwhile he went on to start multiple companies including Zane Publishing, a CD-ROM publishing company, that he took public in 1995. He founded Extend Health which sold in 2012 for over $400 million dollars. Pilzer also founded Zane Benefits that gives helps companies help their employees buy their own health insurance. Pilzer served as an economic advisor to President Reagan, he ran unsuccessfully for Congress in Texas in 1991, and he haswritten several books.

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  • Michael Weinholtz, CEO of CHG Healthcare Services, on KCPW's The Bottom Line (Part 2)

    WeinholtzThe Bottom Line (Air Date: July 29, 2014) – (Part 2 of 2-part interview) Michael Weinholtz is the CEO of CHG Healthcare Services, the nation’s leading provider of physicians and nurses for short term staffing needs, a term the industry calls locum tenens. In 2013, CHG placed more than 10,000 medical providers across the nation who provided care to approximately 17 million patients. Salt Lake City-based CHG employs over 1,750 people company-wide, is privately owned and generates over a half a billion dollars a year in revenues. Weinholtz shares his thoughts on CHG’s early decision to provide benefits to same sex married couples, and his personal support of progressive political issues. Weinholtz talks about his early entrepreneurial efforts with physician staffing with a company called Therapist Unlimited in 1992. He also explains the reasoning behind the company’s decision not to go public. Weinholtz also shares his background working as third generation auto factory worker in Buffalo, New York, and what it taught him about leadership.

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  • Michael Weinholtz, CEO of CHG Healthcare Services, on KCPW's The Bottom Line (Part 1)

    WeinholtzThe Bottom Line (Air Date: July 22, 2014) – (Part 1 of 2-part interview) Michael Weinholtz is the CEO of CHG Healthcare Services,the nation’s leading provider of physicians and nurses for short term staffing needs, a term the industry calls locum tenens. In 2013, CHG placed more than 10,000 medical providers across the nation who, in turn, provided care to approximately 17 million patients. Salt Lake City-based CHG employs over 1,750 people company-wide, is privately owned and generates over a half a billion dollars a year in revenues. Weinholtz discusses how CHG’s corporate culture has grown to be recognized as one of the best companies to work for in the U.S. He also describes how CHG involved its entire to staff to brainstorm how the company would weather the economic recession, and how despite the trying economic times CHG continued its policy of adding a new benefit for staff each year. Weinholtz also discusses the chronic problem of physician and nurse staffing shortages in the U.S.

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  • Stuart Utgaard, Former CEO of Sportsman’s Warehouse, on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    The Bottom Line (Air Date: July 15, 2014) – Stuart Utgaard is the former CEO of Sportsman’s Warehouse. Utgaard originally purchased the company in the mid 1990′s and grew the company rapidly from a single Utah store to a national chain with 73 locations in 33 states. At its peak in 2007, his stores generated over $900 million a year. While sportsman’s was thriving, the company maintained a corporate jet and Utgaard was recognized for multiple entrepreneurial awards. He also befriended the late Larry H Miller, former owner of the Utah Jazz. Utgaard describes how the company struggled with its large operating systems and investment partners just before the catastrophic Financial Crisis in 2008. Eventually Utgaard was forced out, the company went bankrupt, and multiple stores across the country were closed and hundreds of employees were laid off. Utgaard shares how he regrets not protecting himself personally from financial loss, and the importance of taking chips off the table when things are good. In 2014 Sportsman’s Warehouse emerged from bankruptcy and achieved Utgaard’s long- term goal of $1 billion a year in revenue and went public on the NASDAQ stock exchange. Utgaard now lives in Kentucky and owns and olive oil store. In 2010 Utgaard published The Sportsman’s Warehouse Story to chronicle his time as the company’s CEO.

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  • Tim Sullivan, President & CEO of Ancestry.com, on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    The Bottom Line (Air Date: July 8, 2014) – Interview with Tim Sullivan, Ancestry.com President & CEO.  Utah-based Ancestry.com is the world’s largest online family history resource. Under Tim Sullivan’s leadership, Ancestory.com has grown to over 2.7 million paying subscribers, and generates more than a half a billion dollars a year in revenue.  It was recently sold to a private equity firm for $1.6 billion.  Sullivan talks about Ancestry.com’s DNA service that helps people learn their ethnic makeup and connects them to their deep genealogical past.  He also explains how Ancestry.com has tried to make family history research easier while not alienating serious genealogy researchers.  Sullivan shares his journey from the University of North Carolina with a Morehead Scholarship and his early interest in documentary film-making.  He later worked for Disney’s home video division, then for Disney in Hong Kong, and later transitioned to Ticketmaster-City Search. Sullivan talks about Ancestry.com’s 2013 $60 million partnership with the LDS Church to bring over one billion historical documents online.

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  • Jana Francis, Co-Founder & President of Steals.com, on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    The Bottom Line (Air Date: July 1, 2014) Interview with Jana Francis, Co-Founder and President of the daily deals site, Steals.com.  Francis describes how she started her company in 2008 with just 160 email addresses and $5,000 dollars from her personal Amex card.  Since then, Steals.com has grown to over $15 million dollars a year in revenue, employs a team of over 70 people, and sends out nearly half a million emails every day.  Francis’ website concept launched before Groupon or Living Social, but unlike those competing websites Steals.com has remained profitable without a marketing budget using word-of-mouth referrals instead to expand their customer base.  Francis describes how while working for KSL.com she partnered with co-founder Rett Clevenger to launch Steals.com.  As a female entrepreneur Francis also shares her experiences climbing corporate ladders while balancing a family life.  Francis talks about how her company manages the risks of pre-purchasing inventory before customers buy it.

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  • Eric Morgan, CEO of AtTask, on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    The Bottom Line (Air Date: June 24, 2014) – Interview with Eric Morgan, CEO of AtTask.  Morgan describes the cloud-based work-management platform that AtTask provides.  He says their online program gives corporate teams a single, central place to manage and control the chaos of a large organization’s work.  He talks about AtTask’s goal to push beyond the e-mail world, and how AtTask’s original founder Scott Johnson developed the original code in the early 2000s. Morgan shares his decision to join the company in 2011, and how AtTask raised nearly $70 million dollars of venture funding including a $38 million dollar in early 2014.  He talks about how the company manages over 2,000 corporate clients and 50 percent year over year customer growth.  And he offers advice for aspiring entrepreneurs.

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  • David Perkins, Founder of High West Distillery, on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    The Bottom Line (Air Date: June 17, 2014) – Interview with David Perkins, founder of High West Distillery.  In 2004, Perkins moved his family to Park City, Utah with an audacious dream to launch a new national brand of premium whiskey.  Ten years later his whiskey is sold in over 40 states and Canada.  Perkins describes how he risked Utah’s arcane liquor laws to establish the state’s first distillery since 1870.  He shares how concerns about cash flow partially lead the business to open the restaurant and also start a line of vodka. He describes the process they took to settle in the historic Beggs House near Main Street. And he talks about the new dude ranch distilling facility – a partnership with Sky Blue Ranch in Wanship, Utah – set to open later this year.

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  • Rick Alden, Founder & Director of Skullcandy, on KCPW's The Bottom Line (Part 2)

    The Bottom Line (Air Date: June 10, 2014) – Rick Alden, Founder and Director of Skullcandy, continues his conversation with host Doug Wells, sharing how Skullcandy re-energized the concept of earbuds.  Alden talks about his decision to hire his father – who had helped popularize snowboarding -  to help him manage Skullcandy’s manufacturing operations in China.  He explains how he moved operations to Park City to be near the chairlifts.  And he talks about his entrepreneurial grandmother who invented a better swimsuit and was named 1955 ‘Designer of the Year’ by Sports Illustrated.  Alden also talks about his involvement with Stance, the thriving sock company, and some of his disappointments and failures.

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  • Rick Alden, Founder & Director of Skullcandy, on KCPW's The Bottom Line (Part 1)

    The Bottom Line (Air Date: June 3, 2014) –Interview with Rick Alden, Founder and Director of Skullcandy.  Alden begins by sharing his early aspirations to be a pro snowboarder in Colorado when the sport was just emerging.  Along the way he developed National Snowboard Inc., and later a snowboard boot binding technology called “Device”.  He talks about the challenges of running a business based around just 16 weeks of winter.  Alden continued to think up original ideas for “things,” such as a GPS unit, and later a pair of headphones with 2 plugs for music and a phone.  Alden explains how his passion for music – and headphones – while snowboarding helped to launch Skullcandy.

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  • Lance Clark, CEO & President of Spillman Technologies, on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    The Bottom Line (Air Date: May 27, 2014) – Interview with Lance Clark, President & CEO of Spillman Technologies, based in Salt Lake City.  Clark describes Spillman’s early beginnings in 1982 as a Utah State University computer science class project, and how the company has come to serve over 1,000 clients in 40 states, and is ranked among the best Utah companies to work for.  Clark shares how he was actually originally turned down for a job with Spillman.  Yet since becoming the company’s well-respected CEO, he explains his philosophy for maintaining a positive and supportive workplace.  Clark also describes how Spillman Technologies partners closely with public safety agencies to stay nationally competitive.

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  • Jeff Smith, Founder & CEO of Alliance Health, on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    The Bottom Line (Air Date: May 20, 2014) – Jeff Smith is the Founder and CEO of Sandy, Utah-based Alliance Health.  Smith describes how Alliance Health functions with a consumer-based model to help people with chronic diseases to navigate the often confusing healthcare field.  Smith talks about deciding to pivot in 2010 from wholesale-purchases to helping consumers directly, which eventually paid off.  Smith also shares his thoughts on leadership, his experience being a serial entrepreneur, and the importance of having choices and competition in the healthcare industry.

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  • Mark Newman, Founder & CEO of Hirevue, on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    The Bottom Line (Air Date: May 6, 2014) – Interview with Mark Newman, Founder and CEO of Hirevue. Newman talks about growing up in Salt Lake City, busing tables for Cafe Rio, and attending Westminster College.  He describes how he was determined to make his vision for a digital job interview platform work, and his early efforts to gather partners and investors for the company.  Newman also shares the company’s early “self-induced” setbacks, and what it’s been like for the business to become highly profitable now.

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  • Robert Workman, Founder & Chief Creative Officer of Goal Zero, on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    The Bottom Line (Air Date: April 29, 2014) – Interview with Robert Workman, Founder and Chief Creative Officer of Bluffdale, Utah-based Goal Zero. Workman describes how he shifted from running a craft store in Provo to realizing the “cause” behind Goal Zero.  He explains why portable solar energy-generating technology can be better than food for helping people in developing countries. Workman also explains his “3 T’s” principle for developing new products, and how Costco helped boost Goal Zero.

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  • Alan Martin, Founder & CEO of Campus Book Rentals, on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    The Bottom Line (Air Date: April 22, 2014) – Interview with Alan Martin, Founder and CEO of Ogden-based Campus Book Rentals.  Martin discusses how he helped pioneer the college textbook rental industry around 2008, and managed to launch the company using credit cards. He also shares how Campus Book Rentals successfully aligned itself with college bookstores, and how his company compares to the Netflix model.

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  • Jill Layfield, CEO of Backcountry.com, on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    The Bottom Line (Air Date: April 15, 2014) – Interview with Jill Layfield, CEO of Backcountry.com.  Layfield shares her journey from school and waitressing, to working for different Internet start-ups in California, and finally to Backcountry.  She also discusses balancing family life with her career, opportunities for women in business, and learning to be a leader.

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  • Jeff Davis, CEO of Orabrush, on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    The Bottom Line (Air Date: April 8, 2014) – Interview with Jeff Davis, CEO of Orabrush, based in Orem, Utah. Davis discusses what attracted him to Orabrush after a career with Proctor & Gamble and how Orabrush broke into Walmart’s market. Davis also shares his moments of struggle, and the reverse marketing ad model that Orabrush helped forge using Youtube.

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  • Stuart Orgill, Co-Founder of Qualtrics, on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    The Bottom Line (Air Date: April 1, 2014) – Interview with Stuart Orgill, Co-Founder of Qualtrics, based in Provo, Utah. Orgill discusses Qualtric’s early beginnings, how the company handled its growth, and why Qualtrics opted to turn down a $500 million purchase offer.

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  • Patrick Byrne, CEO of Overstock.com, on KCPW's The Bottom Line

    The Bottom Line (Air Date: March 25, 2014) – Interview with Patrick Byrne, CEO and Founder of Overstock.com. Byrne shares his philosophy for running a fundamentally sound company, the wisdom behind Overstock University for his employees, and the importance of a balanced educational experience. He also discusses his father’s relationship with Warren Buffet, and some new businesses Overstock plans to launch.

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